You have found your dream house and are packing up to move in.  While moving can be stressful for humans, it can really freak out the family pet.  My assistant moved from New Hampshire to Arizona with two dogs and a cat in tow (along with their RV).  She says that it was fortunate that cats have nine lives, because this cat howled one life away during the cross-country trip.

If you are looking at homes and have family pets, think about including their needs in your “want” list.  Is there a fenced yard for your dog?  Take a walk around the neighborhood.  If there is a local park, does it allow dogs?  Is there a dog park in the area?  If your cat is strictly indoors, is there a room that has a window that would make a perfect home for a kitty condo or shelving?

Cats are notorious for hiding in boxes.  We have all read stories about movers packing up a home, only to find that they have also accidently packed the family cat in a box!  Most animal experts suggest keeping your dog or cat in one room of the house on moving day.  If you can kennel your pets for the day, you won’t have to worry about them “making a run for it” if someone accidently opens a door. 

If you are taking a road trip with your furry (or feathered) family, using a safe, well-ventilated carrier is a must.  Be sure to secure the carrier with a seat belt for added safety.  If you will be traveling for more than a day, you may want to do some research on pet-friendly hotels.  Make sure you have a “travel” bag for your pet that includes food and treats, water, bowls, a few toys and any medications they take.  For cats, a disposable litter box is a must.  Another thing to include in your pet’s travel bag is current veterinary records.  If your pet has not spent time in a crate or carrier, you might want to consider acclimating them about a month before you leave.  Start by putting their meals and special treats in the crate with the door open.  After about a week, put the meal in the crate and close the door.  Gradually increase the amount of time your pet spends in the crate.  Hopefully by the time you are ready to hit the road, your pet will be ready as well. 

Once you get to your new home, consider keeping your dog or cat in one room with food, water, toys and a litter box if needed.  Keep the door closed and labeled so that the movers don’t open it.  It is tempting to let your pet roam throughout their new digs, but it could be a bit overwhelming.  By letting them adjust to their new surroundings, it will make the transition easier on them (and you). 

Finally, don’t forget to update your microchip information with your new address and phone number.  Consider keeping your dog on a leash for their first few walks around the neighborhood.  It may actually be a local law or HOA policy, and this will prevent Fido from getting lost in case something spooks him or he sees Sammy Squirrel.

If you are looking for recommendations for a local veterinary service, groomer, kennel or dog park, give me a call.  At Team Heitz, our pets are an important part of our families and we are here to help.